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Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Xbox Series X|S FPS Boost: Every game and how it works

Microsoft’s latest and greatest consoles elevate these classics with FPS Boost.

doubled down on backward compatibility with the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S, bringing forward Xbox One, Xbox 360, and original Xbox titles to its latest consoles. The company is no stranger to flexing its engineering know-how through its backward-compatibility program, with various features devoted to preserving titles across new systems. FPS Boost is the latest, bringing huge performance upgrades to existing titles, often doubling framerates with a simple toggle.

Here’s what you need to know about Xbox’s FPS Boost feature, plus which titles support it.

What is Xbox FPS Boost?

With the arrival of Xbox Series X and Series S, debuted FPS Boost, a new system-level feature designed to bolster performance across backward-compatible titles. This trickery alters how games play with no developer input or code changes, unbinding titles from their previous locked framerates. Whereas one title may have targeted 30 frames per second (FPS) on Xbox One consoles, FPS Boost tweaks it to run at 60 FPS on Xbox Series X and Series S consoles.

Next-generation Xbox hardware has seen games targeting higher framerates than ever before, with titles frequently hitting 60 FPS and 120 FPS. The higher the framerate, the more frames outputted to your display each second, resulting in more fluid and responsive gameplay. But refreshing the outputted image more frequently asks more from the system, pushing intensive titles to compromise with lower framerates.

While the Xbox One X hoped to deliver 4K resolution at 60 FPS, later years would expose several hardware limitations, with many graphically demanding releases settling at just 30 FPS. These games would be “locked” at fixed framerates in software, meaning they won’t see improvements on Xbox Series X and Series S under normal conditions.

FPS Boost delivers a fast and easy way to bring higher framerates to existing Xbox One games on next-generation hardware without the additional development resources required for a formal Xbox Series X|S Optimized patch. It makes older titles automatically run smoother on the new systems, delivering a massive upgrade over standard backward compatibility. It’s even expanding the list of Xbox Series X|S games with 120 FPS support.

List of Xbox Series X/S FPS Boost games

launched Xbox FPS Boost in March 2021, starting with a small initial wave of titles, and since expanded with regular new additions. The feature has since picked up support from top publishers like Electronic Arts, Ubisoft, Bethesda, and Square Enix, enhancing several top experiences from the Xbox One generation. With little work from game developers, expect more FPS Boost titles to hit Xbox Series X and Series S over the months ahead. The largest expansion of the feature brought over 70 new games with FPS Boost support, with Dark Souls III the most recent standalone addition. The latest addition to the service debuted during the Xbox 20th anniversary show, bringing original Xbox and Xbox 360 games to Xbox FPS Boost for the first time.

Below follows the complete list of Xbox Series X/S FPS Boost titles so far, coupled with their target framerates when the feature is enabled. Several titles, which may see degraded visuals with FPS Boost enabled, also have the feature disabled by default. The optional support can be manually enabled in system settings, as detailed below.

Game
Boosted framerate (FPS)
Automatically enabled

Alan Wake
60 FPS
Yes

Alien Isolation
60 FPS
Yes

Anthem
60 FPS (Series X Only)
No

Assassin’s Creed
60 FPS
Yes

Assassin’s Creed III Remastered
60 FPS
No

Assassin’s Creed III Rogue Remastered
60 FPS
Yes

Assassin’s Creed The Ezio Collection
60 FPS
Yes

Assassin’s Creed Unity
60 FPS
Yes

Battle Chasers: Nightwar
120 FPS
Yes

Battlefield 1
120 FPS (Series X Only)
No

Battlefield 4
120 FPS
Yes

Battlefield Hardline
120 FPS
Yes

Battlefield V
120 FPS (Series X Only)
No

Beholder Complete Edition
60 FPS
Yes

Binary Domain
60 FPS
Yes

Black College Football Xperience: Doug Williams Ed
60 FPS
Yes

Darksiders
60 FPS
Yes

Dark Souls III
60 FPS
Yes

Dead Island Definitive Edition
60 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Dead Island: Riptide Definitive Edition
60 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Dead Space 2
60 FPS
Yes

Dead Space 3
60 FPS
Yes

Deus Ex Mankind Divided
60 FPS
Yes

Disney’s Chicken Little
60 FPS
Yes

DiRT 4
120 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Dishonored: Death of the Outsider
60 FPS
No

Dishonored: Definitive Edition
60 FPS
Yes

Don’t Starve: Giant Edition
120 FPS
Yes

Dragon Age: Origins
60 FPS
Yes

Dragon Age 2
60 FPS
Yes

Dragon Age: Inquisition
60 FPS
Yes

Dungeon Defenders II
60 FPS
Yes

Dying Light
60 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Fable Anniversary
60 FPS
Yes

Fable III
60 FPS
Yes

Fallout 3
60 FPS
Yes

Fallout: New Vegas
60 FPS
Yes

Fallout 4
60 FPS
No

Fallout 76
60 FPS
No

Far Cry 3
60 FPS
Yes

Far Cry 4
60 FPS
Yes

Far Cry 5
60 FPS
No

Far Cry New Dawn
60 FPS
No

Far Cry Primal
60 FPS
Yes

F.E.A.R
60 FPS
Yes

F.E.A.R. 3
60 FPS
Yes

Final Fantasy XIII-2
60 FPS
Yes

Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII
60 FPS
Yes

Gears of War
60 FPS
Yes

Gears of War: Ultimate Edition
60 FPS
Yes

Gears of War 2
60 FPS
Yes

Gears of War 3
60 FPS
No

Gears of War 4
60 FPS
No

Golf with your Friends
120 FPS
Yes

Halo Wars 2
60 FPS
Yes

Halo: Spartan Assault
120 FPS
Yes

Hollow Knight: Voidheart Edition
120 FPS
Yes

Homefront: The Revolution
60 FPS
No

Hyperscape
120 FPS
No

Island Saver
120 FPS
Yes

Kameo: Elements of Power
60 FPS
Yes

LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham
60 FPS
Yes

LEGO Jurassic World
60 FPS
Yes

LEGO Marvel Superheroes 2
60 FPS
Yes

LEGO Marvel Superheroes
120 FPS (Series X), 60 FPS (Series S)
Yes

LEGO Marvel’s Avengers
120 FPS (Series X), 60 FPS (Series S)
Yes

LEGO STAR WARS: The Force Awakens
60 FPS
Yes

LEGO The Hobbit
120 FPS (Series X), 60 FPS (Series S)
Yes

LEGO: The Lord of the Rings
60 FPS
Yes

LEGO The Incredibles
60 FPS
Yes

LEGO Worlds
60 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Life is Strange
60 FPS
Yes

Life is Strange 2
60 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Lords of the Fallen
60 FPS
Yes

Mad Max
120 FPS (Series X) 60 FPS (Series S)
Yes

Medal of Honor: Airborne
60 FPS
Yes

Metro 2033 Redux
120 FPS
Yes

Metro Last Light Redux
120 FPS
Yes

Mirror’s Edge
60 FPS
Yes

Mirror’s Edge Catalyst
120 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Monster Energy Supercross 3
60 FPS
No

MotoGP 20
60 FPS (Series S Only)
Yes

Moving Out
120 FPS
Yes

My Friend Pedro
120 FPS
Yes

My Time at Portia
60 FPS
Yes

New Super Lucky’s Tale
120 FPS
Yes

NIER
60 FPS
Yes

Overcooked! 2
120 FPS
Yes

Paladins
120 FPS
Yes

Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare 2
120 FPS
Yes

Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare
120 FPS
Yes

Plants vs. Zombies: Battle for Neighborville
120 FPS
No

Power Rangers: Battle for the Grid
120 FPS
Yes

Prey
60 FPS
Yes

Realm Royale
120 FPS
Yes

Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City
60 FPS
Yes

ReCore
60 FPS
Yes

Rock of Ages
60 FPS
Yes

Sea of Solitude
60 FPS
Yes

Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition
60 FPS
Yes

Shadow Warrior 2
60 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Sleeping Dogs Definitive Edition
60 FPS
Yes

SMITE
120 FPS
No

Sniper Elite 4
60 FPS
Yes

Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed
60 FPS
Yes

Sonic Generations
60 FPS
Yes

Sonic Unleashed
60 FPS
Yes

STAR WARS Battlefront
120 FPS
Yes

STAR WARS Battlefront II
120 FPS (Series X Only)
No

STAR WARS: The Clone Wars
60 FPS
Yes

STEEP
60 FPS (Series S Only)
Yes

Super Lucky’s Tale
120 FPS
Yes

SUPERHOT
120 FPS
Yes

The Elder Scrolls VI: Oblivion
60 FPS
Yes

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition
60 FPS
Yes

The Evil Within 2
60 FPS
No

The Gardens Between
120 FPS (Series X), 60 FPS (Series S)
Yes

The LEGO Movie 2 Videogame
60 FPS
Yes

The LEGO Movie Videogame
120 FPS
Yes

Titanfall
120 FPS (Series X Only)
Yes

Titanfall 2
120 FPS
No

Tom Clancy’s The Division
60 FPS
Yes

Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition
60 FPS
Yes

Totally Reliable Delivery Service
120 FPS
Yes

Two Point Hospital
60 FPS
Yes

UFC 4
60 FPS
Yes

Unravel 2
120 FPS
No

Unruly Heroes
120 FPS
Yes

Untitled Goose Game
120 FPS
Yes

Vandal Hearts: Flames of Judgment
60 FPS
Yes

Wasteland 3
60 FPS
No

Watch Dogs
60 FPS
Yes

Watch Dogs 2
60 FPS
Yes

Yakuza 6: The Song of Life
60 FPS
Yes

Future FPS Boost-enabled titles for Xbox Series X and Series S will be added to this list once announced.

Ultimate performance

Xbox Series X

See at Microsoft
See at Amazon
See at Best Buy

120 FPS all the things!

The Xbox Series X is the pinnacle of Microsoft’s next-gen console gaming vision and incorporates powerful hardware that can push games to their max. More games run better in Xbox FPS Boost on Xbox Series X, though it is more expensive and harder to get ahold of.

Affordable next-gen

Xbox Series S

See at Microsoft
See at Amazon
See at Best Buy

120 FPS with caveats

The Xbox Series S is a fantastic true next-gen console for those who don’t want to shell out the cash for the more larger and more powerful Xbox Series X. If you’re okay with missing Xbox FPS Boost on some titles, this is cheaper and easier to grab.

How to use FPS Boost on Xbox Series X and Series S

FPS Boost hit Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S with the Xbox March Update in 2021, included with official updates for both consoles. It’s ready to go as a system-level feature and automatically kicks in when playing many supported titles. Using FPS Boost requires no game updates or additional work from players.

With most FPS Boost games, support automatically kicks in when starting a game on Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S devices. Almost every game with FPS Boost upgrades works with the best Xbox console, Xbox Series X, although just a small minority of titles lack Xbox Series S support. You can check whether FPS mode is enabled via the following steps.

Navigate to My games & apps on your Xbox console.
Move your cursor to an FPS boost-compatible game.
Press the Menu button.
Select Manage game and add-ons.
Select the Compatibility options tile.
Check the FPS Boost box to enable FPS Boost.

Some titles with FPS Boost support may also supply these upgrades only on Xbox Series X systems, leaving their Xbox Series S counterparts upgrade-free. Check the complete list of FPS Boost titles above for a per-game breakdown.

When FPS Boost is active with compatible titles, your Xbox console will display an FPS Boost icon through the Xbox Guide menu. Pressing the Xbox button to open the Guide will display the FPS BOOST signifier in the top right-hand corner of the screen, adjacent to the Auto HDR icon, if active.

For most titles, FPS Boost will deliver immediate upgrades no matter your setup. However, with titles leveraging the feature to achieve 120 FPS, it’s crucial to ensure your screen matches the criteria. While 60Hz refresh rates have been long the norm for TVs, the 120Hz refresh rate demanded by 120 FPS titles requires a specialist display. Furthermore, 4K resolution at 120Hz demands the latest 4K TV tech, including the all-new HDMI 2.1 connector, which supports this high-bandwidth output. It’s reserved for the best 4K TVs for Xbox Series X and Series S, although new options are steadily hitting the market.

Does FPS Boost impact graphics?

debuted FPS Boost as a seamless upgrade on Xbox Series X and Series S, and in most cases, it’s a free performance boost with no negative impact on visuals. However, FPS Boost can potentially impact overall visual quality compared to the stock, unmodified game. This impacts Xbox Series X, although all Xbox Series S games remain unaffected.

The caveat ties back to Xbox One X Enhanced titles, upgraded for Microsoft’s first 4K Xbox console released in 2017. The device brought a massive GPU upgrade over the standard Xbox One, and subsequent games leveraged this hardware, essentially using raw power to achieve a higher 4K resolution.

These games, now seeing FPS Boost improvements, can in many cases deliver 4K resolution with 60 FPS or 120 FPS upgrades. However, some games cannot provide a smooth 4K 60 FPS via backward compatibility, with instead hampering the visual quality to achieve a higher framerate.

These FPS Boost-enabled titles lose their Xbox One X enhancements when on Xbox Series X, delivering their high framerates at the settings of standard Xbox One consoles. It can result in a lower resolution, worse effects, and overall muddied presentation versus the title with Xbox FPS Boost disabled. Fallout 4 and Fallout 76 are among those impacted by this tradeoff.

Thankfully, makes FPS Boost entirely optional so that you can choose between 4K visuals or a slick 60 FPS.

How to disable FPS Boost on Xbox Series X/S

claims to extensively test every title with FPS Boost support, which should mean all the benefits with minor drawbacks on the system. But FPS Boost does have the potential to impact visuals in some cases, and if you encounter issues, Microsoft has included a toggle in the Xbox OS. It’s quick and easy to disable the feature on a per-game basis, which returns the game to its original state.

Navigate to My games & apps on your Xbox console.
Move your cursor to an FPS boost-compatible game.
Press the Menu button.
Select Manage game and add-ons.
Select the Compatibility options tile.
Uncheck the FPS Boost box to disable FPS Boost.

To enable FPS Boost, follow the steps and re-check the FPS Boost check box.

Is Xbox ‘Resolution Boost’ coming to Xbox Series X and Series S?

FPS Boost is the latest Xbox backward-compatibility enhancement, modernizing games with framerates fit for the current generation. It stems from ongoing efforts to upgrade existing titles for the newest Xbox consoles, without touching game code, previously including 4K upgrades for Xbox 360 and original Xbox experience. And while hasn’t announced a “Resolution Boost”-style feature for Xbox Series X and Series S, it appears a likely addition, given a previous tease from Microsoft.

“The compatibility team has invented brand-new techniques that enable even more titles to run at higher resolutions and image quality while still respecting the artistic intent and vision of the original creators,” said Jason Ronald, director of program management for Xbox Series X in August 2020. “We are also creating whole new classes of innovations including the ability to double the frame rate of a select set of titles from 30 FPS to 60 FPS or 60 FPS to 120 FPS.”

While FPS Boost brings the ability to “double the frame rate” of existing Xbox One games, we’re yet to see the equivalent upgrades to resolutions and image quality. While we don’t have a timeline, it appears to be on the cards for the future.

Xbox FPS Boost joins a number of features joining the Xbox backward-compatibility list, designed to enhance and upgrade classics into the next generation. Let us know which games you hope to see with FPS Boost next in the comments section.

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Now including Microsoft, Bethesda, EA, and more

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Microsoft’s latest and greatest consoles elevate these classics with FPS Boost.

doubled down on backward compatibility with the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S, bringing forward Xbox One, Xbox 360, and original Xbox titles to its latest consoles. The company is no stranger to flexing its engineering know-how through its backward-compatibility program, with various features devoted to preserving titles across new systems. FPS Boost is the latest, bringing huge performance upgrades to existing titles, often doubling framerates with a simple toggle.

Here’s what you need to know about Xbox’s FPS Boost feature, plus which titles support it.

What is Xbox FPS Boost?

With the arrival of Xbox Series X and Series S, debuted FPS Boost, a new system-level feature designed to bolster performance across backward-compatible titles. This trickery alters how games play with no developer input or code changes, unbinding titles from their previous locked framerates. Whereas on…

Source : Windows Central – News, Forums, Reviews, Help for Windows 10, Windows 11, and all things Microsoft. Read More

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